Editor, Webmaster:  Phil Cartwright       Editor@earlyjas.org
In Tune -- by Bill Fuller
Additions, comments, corrections, contributions
to Bill Fuller %Earlyjas, or e-mail:
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Early Collectibles

If anyone in the early history of jazz could be called a child prodigy it was reedman Sidney
Bechet who, at the age of six, embarked upon teaching himself the clarinet. Freddie Keppard”
s New Orleans Band welcomed Sidney to sit in with them when he was eight. At age nine he
became friends with New Orleans clarinetist  George Baquet offered young Sidney formal
lessons. At thirteen he played in his brother’s band and at seventeen became a member of
New Orleans’ famous Eagle Jazz Band.

In a section of the 1945 edition of the Esquire Magazine’s “Yearbook of the Jazz Scene,” a
number of early jazz “greats” were featured along with discographies that highlighted the
approximate monetary values (in 1945 dollars) of certain collectible releases by a number of
these artists.
Below you will find some of what Esquire rated as Sidney Bechet recordings particularly
desirable by 1945 collectors. Each of the recordings below were estimated by Esquire, in
1945, to have a collector’s value of between $35-$50.
Since that is some 68 years ago, those of you with any extensive collection of 78 rpm records
might want to check out what you have by Sidney Bechet and cross-reference it with what is
presented here. Then open up an e-bay account!

KANSAS CITY MAN- written by Clarence Johnson and  *Clarence Williams in 1923.
Sidney Bechet recorded this with Clarence Williams on OKeh 4925 with “Wild Cat Blues” on
the flip side.
COAL CART BLUES – written by Louis and Lil Armstrong in 1923. Bechet recorded this
also with Clarence Williams on OKeh 8245 with “Santa Claus Blues” on the other side.
MANDY MAKE UP YOUR MIND- written by Grant Clark and George Meyer in 1924 for
the score of “Dixie to Broadway.” Sidney recorded it with Clarence Williams on  OKeh
40260 with “I’m a Little Blackbird” on the ‘B’ side.
CAKEWALKIN’ BABIES FROM HOME – written by Chris Smith and Clarence Williams in
1924 and was first recorded by a bandvnamed after the Red Onion Café in New Orleans.
Check out OKeh 40321.
* Clarence Williams was the director of OKeh Records from 1923 to 1928.

RIMSHOT: To jazz buff Brooke Anderson who, after reading the December ’13, “In Tune,”
informs us that there was a tune called “Swing Along” composed by Will Marion Cook
presented by James Reese Europe in his Carnegie Hall concert of 1912.

Early Collectibles (part 2)
New Orleans clarinetist, Johnny Dodds, was born in 1892 and died in 1940 after a stellar
career with such notables as Joe “King” Oliver, Louis Armstrong, and Lil Hardin. He started
playing when he was 16, and soon thereafter got jobs in New Orleans with Kid Ory and with
the Eagle Band. He left for Chicago in 1918, and by 1920 he had hooked up with King Oliver’
s band. He left Oliver in 1924, and formed his own group which played at Chicago’s Kelly’s
Stable for about six years.
In a section of the 1945 edition of the Esquire Magazine’s “Yearbook of the Jazz Scene,” a
number of early jazz “greats” were featured along with discographies that highlighted the
approximate monetary values (in 1945 dollars) of certain collectible releases by a number of
these artists.
Below you will find some of what Esquire rated as Johnny Dodds recordings particularly
desirable by 1945 collectors. Each of the recordings below were estimated by Esquire, in
1945, to have a collector’s value of between $30-$50.
Some 69 years have passed since that estimate was offered. Therefore those of you with any
extensive collection of 78 rpm records might want to check out what you have by Johnny
Dodds and cross-reference it with what is presented here. Depending on its condition it could
be pretty valuable.
-DIPPERMOUTH BLUES- This tune, which refers to one of Armstrong’s many nicknames,
was written in 1923 by King Oliver and Louis Armstrong. It was recorded by Johnny Dodds
on the Gennet label (#5132) with “Weatherbird Rag” on the flip side.
-CHIMES BLUES – written by King Oliver and arranged for his Creole Jazz Band by Lil
Hardin. Dodds made this recording, for Gennet (#5135), with Jelly Roll Morton’s “Froggie
Moore” on the flip side.
-SNAKE RAG – another 1923 King Oliver tune, again arranged by Lil Hardin (Armstrong’s
second wife) and recorded by Johnny Dodds also for Gennet (#5184). Dodds also recorded it
later for OKeh (#4933).
-MABEL’S DREAM- originally titled “Maybelle’s Dream” this 1923 dance tune by Ike Smith
was recorded by Johnny for OKeh (#8235) with “Sweet Baby Doll” on the flip side.
-RIVERSIDE BLUES – written in 1923 by Thomas A. Dorsey and Richard M. Jones, this
tune was recorded by Dodds for the Paramount label (#20292).

Early Collectibles  (part 3)

Edward Kennedy (Duke) Ellington is truly a Mount Rushmore figure in the history of jazz.
His big band performance, recording, and compositional skills reigned at the forefront of
American music from the 1920’s till his death in 1974.
He was born in 1899 in Washington D.C. and began piano lessons from his mother at age 7.
In his teens he studied with other teachers and secured a solo spot at a D.C. venue called the
Poodle Dog. After high school he organized his first band, the Washingtonians which played
for a number of local functions. After that he spent some time with the Wilber Sweatman
organization which led him, ultimately, to New York. After having summoned his Washington
friends he secured a job in 1924 at the Kentucky Club which lasted for three years. It was
after this, in 1927, that he secured a spot at Harlem’s Cotton Club. At this time, because of
frequent radio broadcasts, tours, and concerts, Ellington’s national reputation skyrocketed.
For almost all the years he led a band he heavily involved himself in composing. By his own
admission his whole band was the instrument by which he experimented with his musical
ideas.
In a section of the 1945 edition of the Esquire Magazine’s “Yearbook of the Jazz Scene,” a
number of early jazz “greats” were featured along with discographies that highlighted the
approximate monetary values (in 1945 dollars) of certain collectible releases by a number of
these artists.
Below you will find some of what Esquire rated as Duke Ellington recordings particularly
desirable by 1945 collectors. Each of the recordings below were estimated by Esquire, in
1945, to have a collector’s value of between $10-$20.
Some 69 years have passed since that estimate was offered. Therefore those of you with any
extensive collection of 78 rpm records might want to check out what you have by Duke
Ellington and cross-reference it with what is presented here. Depending on its condition it
could be pretty valuable.
BLACK AND TAN  FANTASY- written in 1927 by Ellington and his trumpet player, Bubber
Miley. It was recorded by Duke’s own band  for Vocalion (#15556).

ST. LOUIS BLUES- 1914, it was W.C. Handy’s first financially successful tune and the one
that launched Handy into the publishing business. The referred-to Ellington recording here
was made with the Warren Mills Serenaders for Victor (#35962)

MY HONEY’S LOVIN’ ARMS – a pop tune written in 1922 by Joe Meyer and Herman
Ruby. The collectible Ellington recording was made with the Gotham Stompers for the
Variety label (#629).

Early Collectibles (part 4)
Earlville Association for Ragtime Lovers Yearning for
Jazz Advancement and Socialization
EARLYJAS
  
    Even though trombonist J.C. Higgenbotham (Higgie) was born in Atlanta, Georgia in
1906, Ohio has a justifiable claim to calling him one of its musical sons. He was educated in
Cincinnati and started playing with a local Cincinnati band under the direction of Wes
Helvey from 1924 to ’25. Even though Higgie wanted to be a tailor, he was convinced to
leave Cincinnati for Buffalo in pursuit of a musical career. From Buffalo it seemed only
natural that he eventually ended up in New York City where he successively hooked up with
the likes of Louis Russell, Fletcher Hendseron, Chick Webb, Louis Armstrong, and Red
Allen, all between 1926 and 1944, a time during which he recorded extensively with all these
folks.
    In a section of the 1945 edition of the Esquire Magazine’s “Yearbook of the Jazz
Scene,” a number of early jazz “greats” were featured along with discographies that
highlighted the approximate monetary values (in 1945 dollars) of certain collectible releases
by a number of these artists.
    Below you will find some of what Esquire rated as J.C. Higgenbotham’s recordings
particularly desirable by 1945 collectors. Each of the recordings below were estimated by
Esquire, in 1945, to have a collector’s value of between $5-$30.
    Some 69 years have passed since that estimate was offered. Therefore those of you with
any extensive collection of 78 rpm records might want to check out what you have by J.C.
Higgenbotham and cross-reference it with what is presented here. Depending on its condition
it could be pretty valuable.

-SUGAR FOOT STOMP – written by Joe ‘King’ Oliver in 1926, and introduced by
Fletcher Henderson and his Orchestra with a trumpet solo by Louis Armstrong. It was
revived by Benny Goodman and his Orchestra in 1937. Higgie recorded it for the Crown
label (#3191) with Connie’s Inn Orchestra. “Low Down Bayou” on the B side.

-MILENBERG JOYS- written by Jelly Roll Morton and recorded by him as a piano solo in
1923. It referred to a resort area outside of New Orleans owned by a Mr. Milne. One source
says the tune was also known as “The Golden Leaf Strut.” Morton’s original title for the
tune was “Pee Hole Blues.” Higgenbotham also recorded this with the Connie’s Inn
Orchestra for the Crown label (#3212) with “Twelfth Street Rag” on the flip side

-SHANGHAI SHUFFLE – written in 1924 by Gene Rodemich who, with his orchestra, also
introduced it. But it was popularized by the Fletcher Henderson Orchestra with Louis
Armstrong . J.C. recorded it with Buster Bailey for Vocalion (#2887) with “Call of Delta” on
the flip side.

-PANAMA- written by Willie Tyers in 1914. Trumpeter Freddie Keppard considered it his
“pet” tune. Recorded by J.C. Higgenbotham for OKeh (#8849) with Louis Russell. “High
Tension” on the backside.